1848-1868: William B. Greene in “The Worcester Palladium”

  1. Omega, [Letter to the editor], The Worcester Palladium 15 no. 23 (June 07, 1848): 3. [see below]
  2. Omega, possibi The Worcester Palladium 16 no. 29 (July 18, 1849): 3
  3. Omega, “Equality.—No. 2. The Banking System,” The Worcester Palladium 16 no. 30 (July 25, 1849): 3
  4. Omega, “Equality.—No. 3. The Repeal of the Usury Laws,” The Worcester Palladium 16 no. 31 (August 1, 1849): 2-3.
  5. Omega, “Capital and Labor.—No. I,” The Worcester Palladium 16 no. 37 (September 12, 1849): 2-3.
  6. Omega, “Capital and Labor.—No. II. Socialism in Massachusetts,” The Worcester Palladium 16 no. 38 (September 19, 1849): 2-3.
  7. Omega, “The Red Republic,” The Worcester Palladium 16 no. 44 (October 31, 1849): 3.
  8. Omega, “Plutocracy,” The Worcester Palladium 16 no. 45 (November 7, 1849): 2-3.
  9. Omega, “Equality—No. 6. Cain and Abel,” The Worcester Palladium 17 no. 31 (July 31, 1850): 3.
  10. Omega, “Plutocracy,” The Worcester Palladium 17 no. 41 (October 9, 1850): 2-3.
  11. Omega, “Resistance to Law,” The Worcester Palladium 18 no. 18 (April 30, 1851): 2.
  12. Omega, “The Bible and State Rights,” The Worcester Palladium 18 no. 20 (May 14, 1851): 3.
  13. Omega, “Free Banking Law,” The Worcester Palladium 18 no. 23 (June 4, 1851): 2.
  14. W. B. G., “Our Foreign Correspondence,” The Worcester Palladium 21 no. 51 (December 20, 1854): 2. [Paris]
  15. Omega, “Our Foreign Correspondence,” The Worcester Palladium 22 no. 12 (March 21, 1855): 2.
  16. Omega, “Our Foreign Correspondence,” The Worcester Palladium 22 no. 19 (May 9, 1855): 2.
  17. Omega, “Our Foreign Correspondence,” The Worcester Palladium 22 no. 20 (May 16, 1855)
  18. Omega, “Our Foreign Correspondence,” The Worcester Palladium 22 no. 44 (October 31, 1855): 2-3. [Turin]
  19. Wm. B. Greene, “Letter from Wm. B. Greene to Edward Atkinson, Esq., on the State of the Currency,” The Worcester Palladium 35 no. 47 (November 18, 1868): 1.

Articles 3-6 were included in Equality (1849) and article 2 became the introduction to Mutual Banking (1850). Those two books then became the basis for The Radical Deficiency Of The Existing Circulating Medium, And The Advantages Of A Mutual Currency (1857) and Mutual Banking, Showing The Radical Deficiencies Of The Existing Circulating Medium, And The Advantages Of A Free Currency (1870). The trend, as was often the case with Greene’s writing, was towards secularization and simplification in later editions. We can now see that something similar occurred in the transition from the original newspaper articles to the the books. Articles 7-12, which generally address the issue of plutocracy, are at once evidence of Greene’s study of Pierre Leroux’s work and of his involvement in the debate at the time between Democrats and Whigs in Massachusetts. “Resistance to Law” provides rare comments by Greene on the idea of anarchy, which, once untangled from his particular religious preoccupations, are perhaps not so distant from what we find in works by Proudhon and Bakunin.

The existence of a sixth number of “Equality” is a bit of a puzzle, with answers probably lost, along with a lot of the details of Greene’s life and work, in the mists of history. But perhaps there is a clue in the structure of the book version of Equality. It seems clear that the title of both articles and book is an echo of Pierre Leroux’s De l’égalité and the structure may have been meant to mimic that of his proposed Sept discours sur la situation actuelle de la société et de l’esprit humain. Leroux’s project seems to have remained unfinished in that form and in 1850 Greene seems to have turned his attention more exclusively to Proudhon and the subject of mutual banking. But it is not outside the realm of possibility that, at some phase, the 1850 Mutual Banking, which incorporated “Equality.—No. 1,” was intended as a continuation of Equality in a much more direct sense, incorporating the texts we are now recovering.


The first article listed above appeared a full year before the material that we can be sure was contributed by William Batchelder Greene and cannot be absolutely established as his work, but it has a tone not unlike some passages we find in other works and is at least entertaining enough to include here:

For the Palladium.

Mr. Editor: It is told and credited for a fact, that some of our city Aldermen made themselves quite busy in giving orders to some of the workmen about the new Church, now building on Front street, with regard to the brick, timbers, &c. The paddies not liking their interference with them threatened to throw them into the canal.

Looking upon them as interlopers, they asked them who they were. But to their great surprise and astonishment they ascertained that they were members of the City Board of Aldermen. What a pity it is that some of our city officials are of such stock that they are mistaken for common men.

OMEGA.

Omega, [Letter to the editor], The Worcester Palladium 15 no. 23 (June 07, 1848): 3.

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